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Monetization for Corporate Video

An enormous amount of discussion takes place across the web on the issue of monetization of video. The concern is that producers are putting a lot of effort and at least some money into developing their video content and getting their creative vision down in pixels – now how do you make money off that effort? The answers can vary, but for the most part they focus on the video community – create your story, find a way to sell it or advertising around it so that you can profit.

As important as this topic is, for the enterprise producer the calculus is noticeably different. Generally speaking you’re not looking to sell a series of corporate pieces to Netflix, Amazon or Hulu; you probably are not interested in selling advertising for other products as a pre- or mid-roll to your product demo. In fact, the video itself is unlikely to be a moneymaker on its own, and it’s probably not intended to do so.

At the end of the day, a corporate video is designed to sell the products or services of the company. Your video is intended to lead viewers on to a purchasing decision, but it’s unlikely that the video will be the sole driver of that revenue. More often the video will be a form of lead generation for the organization’s sales team – a video view will translate into a sales contact which hopefully becomes a finalized sale. On the plus side, this takes a lot of pressure off the video producer – there’s no expectation that noticeable revenue will be driven by the video itself. You don’t have to get nervous about getting picked up by a large streaming provider, a YouTube syndicator, or draw large numbers of ad impressions.

On the challenge side, this means it can be harder to point to the video as a revenue generator instead of a cost center. If the sale does not depend on the video, how can you demonstrate to management that the video department is driving revenue? It’s not a simple question to answer, but the two most important steps to manage are calls to action and metrics. By adding direct calls to action within the video, you can ensure that the video provides an immediate opportunity to connect with the company and its experts. If you’re doing a piece involving a subject matter expert (SME) from the organization, be sure there’s easy connectivity to reach that SME directly. Metrics always provide understanding of the success of a video, and they can be useful as an indicator that your message is reaching the key audiences.

One critical step here is to be sure to take advantage of URL techniques that can help tell you where your users are coming from. Tagging and tracking codes within URLs can provide very specific feedback on the source of the click – an email campaign, a particular webpage, and of course from within a video page. If you’re not familiar with the coding on the URL, work with your web development teams to create URLs that will help indicate that a user reached out to your organization after watching one of your video pieces.

In the end video for most organizations is a means to an end, but there are still key steps you can take to make sure your efforts are helping drive revenue.

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